Data Science Postdoctoral Fellows

Chang-Yu Chang

Chang-Yu Chang

Department of Biology

Sarah Lee

Sarah Lee

Department of Linguistics

Sergey Molodtsov

Department of Earth and Environmental Science

Kieran Murphy

Kieran Murphy

Department of Physics and Astronomy

Roland Neil

Roland Neil

Department of Criminology

Roland Neil is a sociologist who uses machine learning algorithms, geospatial analysis, and semi-parametric models to study crime and the criminal justice system. His work focuses on using large administrative datasets and advanced methods of data science to address inferential challenges faced when studying racial disparities and discrimination in policing and the life course origins of offending and criminal justice contact. His recent papers appear in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Journal of Sociology, and the Annual Review of Criminology. He holds a PhD in sociology from Harvard University.

Erçağ Pinçe

Erçağ Pinçe

Department of Biology

Stefan Schulze

Stefan Schulze

Department of Biology

Ivan Simpson-Kent

Ivan Simpson-Kent

Department of Psychology

Ivan Simpson-Kent received his Ph.D. in Medical Science from Cambridge University in 2021. Prior to his Ph.D., Dr. Simpson-Kent was a Fulbright Fellow in Zoology at Universität Regensburg in Germany, and received a B.S. in neuroscience with secondary major in philosophy and minor in mathematics from the University of Scranton. During his postdoctoral fellowship, Dr. Simpson-Kent is investigating the associations between environmental factors, cognition, and brain development in children. To do so, he uses methods from network science and structural equation modeling to help tease apart the myriad of complex interactions among these variables and levels of organization.

Dimitrios Tanoglidis

Dimitrios Tanoglidis

Department of Physics and Astronomy

Colin Twomey

Colin Twomey

Department of Biology

From “fright waves” in schooling fish to the emergence of shared vocabularies for colors in human language, Colin studies the natural algorithms underlying collective behavior in living systems. His work takes a quantitative, computational approach to understanding the flow of information between group-members, as well as to the development of new methods for inferring the determinants of group-level behavioral patterns (e.g. to identify the latent “communicative needs” for colors in different languages around the world). You can read more about Colin’s research at www.colintwomey.com

DDD will host a program of Penn Arts and Sciences Data Science Postdoctoral Fellows. There are two paths to becoming a fellow

  1. Via DDD support (up to 50 percent salary support) for up to three years. These postdocs could either already be at Penn or they could be new hires. SAS faculty may apply for postdoc funding here
  2. This is available to all current or incoming SAS postdocs: if data science is a significant part of your research and you are interested in cross-disciplinary interactions, you are invited to apply to become a Fellow of our program. You will join an exciting group of postdocs spanning the social and natural sciences, will have weekly interactions with faculty and visitors, and will have a research fund (up to $5K total) to support your travel and visitors. Postdocs may apply here

For more questions send us an email.