The Man in the Sky

Source: The Lament for Icarus by Herbert James Draper The Man in the Sky By Aisha Daffeh   Every day was the same for Isaac. He woke up, tossing his tattered gray duvet onto his bed. He stood in front of the mirror in his minuscule bedroom, delicately putting on his work uniform, which consisted of a […]

The Hero’s Journey

Source: Ancient Origins The Hero’s Journey By Lily Nesvold   ​​As a modern, musical interpretation of Virgil’s Aeneid, “The Hero’s Journey” is an instrumental track created using GarageBand, a digital audio workstation, combined with Renderforest, a music visualizer service. I created this piece as my final project for CLST-143, “Great Books of Greece and Rome,” […]

Meet the Penn Classical Studies Class of 2021!

By Elizabeth Vo-Phamhi   Every year, we here at Discentes have sadly bid another graduating class farewell while happily celebrating their achievements by featuring some of our newest Classical Studies and Ancient History alumni. The recently-graduated Class of 2021 is unique – they completed their entire senior year remotely, yet they excelled. In this most […]

Carro cura carere

Carro cura carere Re-evaluating the Roman Carrus By David Picker-Kille   I. Introduction As an aspiring classical archaeologist with an interest in Roman land transport, the recent groundbreaking discovery of the four-wheeled “chariot” at the Villa Giuliana north of Pompeii[2] has highlighted for me the presence of an issue of translation between English and Italian that […]

Why Classics?

“The School of Athens” (1509-1511) fresco by Raphael. Credit: History.com “Why Classics?” By Olivia Wells   When people ask me what I’m studying, I often find that they don’t understand what I mean by “classics,” and in the rare case that they do, they sometimes can’t wrap their head around why I’d want to major […]

Either Language

Raphael’s School of Athens in the Stanza della Segnatura, Papal Palace, Vatican / Credit: Steven Zucker Either Language By Jinna Han   What was that word again? It’s there just at the edge of my mind, hovering, waiting, expecting me to be able to grasp it while I’m still too busy stumbling over the other […]

The Wealth of the Countryside

Claude Lorrain (1604-1682), Pastoral Landscape. Yale University Art Gallery. Virgil, Georgics 2.458-542 Translated by Sara Chopra   Oh, farmers, all too lucky – if they could only know their own fortune! – For whom Earth herself, queen of righteousness, Pours out a simple living from the soil – so far from the clash of the […]