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RELEVANT CONTENT

Joe Biden: Reclaiming America’s Values

The former Vice President of the U.S. and head of the Penn Biden Center for Diplomacy and Global Engagement wrote an opinion for The New York Times.

OMNIA Q&A: Sixty Years After the Civil Rights Act of 1957, Where Are We?

Former Civil Rights Commission Chair Mary Frances Berry, Geraldine R. Segal Professor of American Social Thought and a professor of history and Africana studies, reflects on then and now.

OMNIA Q&A: Ending DACA

Emilio Parrado, Dorothy Swaine Thomas Professor of Sociology, discusses the repeal of DACA.

Setting the Record Straight

The Department of Criminology’s new Fact Check site unmasks false claims surrounding the criminal justice system.

Russia Hacked our Election Because the Spies Took Over

History Ph.D.s Alex Hazanov and Yakov Feygin analyze Russian efforts to influence U.S. elections.

Penn Fels Policy Research Initiative Announces New Interdisciplinary Grants

The Penn Fels Policy Research Initiative will fund nine working groups and conferences through the end of 2017.

Has Polling Lost its Reputation?

A Q&A with Associate Professor of Political Science John Lapinski, director of the Penn Program on Opinion Research and Election Studies (PORES).

Scare Tactics and Public Relations Strategies Around Climate Change

Following a grim New York Magazine story on the future with climate change, Assistant Professor of Sociology Daniel A. Cohen discussed scare tactics with KCRW radio in Los Angeles.

The Past, Present, and Future of Human Migration

A multi-faculty discussion featuring sociology’s Hans-Peter Kohler, Tukufu Zuberi, Amada Armenta, and Emilio Parrado, and political science’s Michael Jones-Correa and Devesh Kapur.

OMNIA Podcast: Constitutional Crisis? (Audio)

Rogers Smith, the Christopher H. Browne Distinguished Professor of Political Science, offers his take on why the firing of James Comey, as well as Trump’s use of executive action and social media, is challenging the balance of power in Washington.

U.S. Foreign Policy in a Trump Administration: A Three-Month Review (Video)

In our April Knowledge by the Slice lunchtime series, a panel of faculty experts from the Department of Political Science assessed the first few months of the Trump administration and what they suggest about the present and future of U.S. foreign policy, from Asia to Europe to the Middle East and beyond.

 

Inglorious Comparisons: Roundtable Discussion

Presented by Penn’s Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures. In the pages of newspapers of record in the United States and Europe, historical comparisons to current political events are flying thick and fast. The European history of the early twentieth century – in particular the rise of European fascism – has become an omnipresent simile. Featuring professors Frank Trommler, Jonathan Steinberg, Susannah Heschel (Dartmouth College), and Susan Buck-Morss (CUNY). 

Immigration and Global Inequality

A panel discussion with Michael Jones-Correa (Political Science), Emilio Parrado (Sociology), and Tukufu Zuberi (Sociology and Africana Studies). Moderated by Dean Steven J. Fluharty, School of Arts and Sciences. 

Trump, Philosophy, and American Politics: Philosophical Implications of the 45th Presidency (Full Event Video)

Penn conference brought together scholars to discuss issues raised by the election, the transition of power, and the new presidential administration.

Protests, Confusion For Executive Order On Refugees

Ian Lustick, the Bess W. Heyman Professor, discusses President Donald Trump’s executive order on refugees on NPR’s On Point podcast.

Fels Institute of Government Launches Inclusive Public Leadership Series

The Fels Institute of Government is pleased to announce the launch of a new Inclusive Public Leadership series. On Wednesday, January 25th, the event series kicked off with a workshop focused on how to understand and influence the legislative process.

Trump’s Election Doesn’t Mean Americans Are More Opposed To Immigration

Daniel Hopkins, associate professor of political science, authors an op-ed on public opinion on immigration.

OMNIA Q&A: Making a Mockery

Ralph Rosen, Vartan Gregorian Professor of the Humanities, on satire, from ancient Greece to “Saturday Night Live.”

It's Time to Get Russia's Strategy Straight

Kevin M. F. Platt of the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures blogs about Russia, election hacking, and conspiracy theory for The Huffington Post.

#DATAREFUGE

 Penn Program in Environmental Humanities Launches Project to Protect Vulnerable Climate Change Research

Making Multicultural Democracy Work in the Trump Years

A panel discussion with a Q&A session.

Faculty Opinion: Stephen Bannon and the Old/New Anti-Semitism

Amy Kaplan, Edward G. Kane Professor of English, authors an op-ed.

Daniel Hopkins on the Rise of Anti-Immigration Politics

Political scientist Daniel Hopkins talks about how immigration played out in the election in this podcast.

Knowledge by the Slice: Election 2016: What Just Happened?

A panel of political scientists discuss election night.

Faculty Q&A: Confronting Islamophobia

A conversation with Jamal J. Elias, Walter H. Annenberg Professor in the Humanities and scholar of Islamic thought, culture, and history.

The True Cost of Vote Buying and Selling

Mary Frances Berry, Geraldine R. Segal Professor of American Social Thought and professor of history and Africana studies, discusses her book, Five Dollars and a Pork Chop Sandwich: Vote Buying and the Corruption of Democracy.

Knowledge by the Slice: New Realities of Latin American Migration to the United States: Implications for Policy Discussions

Faculty Opinion: No, Trump Voters Were Not Irrational

Robert Kurzban, professor of psychology, addresses voter rationality.

Quechua Penn

A thriving Native-American language program makes Penn a Quechua hub.

UPCOMING EVENTS

Dismantling the Carceral State: Law, Order, and Criminal Justice Reform in the Age of Trump

Tuesday, September 26, 2017

World Cafe Live
3025 Walnut Street
6:00 p.m.–7:00 p.m.

Marie Gottschalk, Penn Arts and Sciences’ professor of political science, studies the origins and politics of mass incarceration, focusing on the idea of a “carceral state” with millions of people who are in prison, on probation, or on parole.

Gottschalk specializes in American politics, criminal justice, health policy, race, the development of the welfare state, and business-labor relations. She was one of the 30 academics, historians, activists, and politicians included in Ana DuVernay’s 13th, a Netflix documentary about mass incarceration that refers to the 13th Amendment, which abolished slavery but left an exploitable loophole: “except as punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted.”

She’s the author of Caught: The Prison State and the Lockdown of American Politics and The Prison and the Gallows: The Politics of Mass Incarceration in America, which won the 2007 Ellis W. Hawley Prize from the Organization of American Historians.

Expert faculty from the University of Pennsylvania shed light on their research in the arts, humanities, and social sciences at the Penn Lightbulb Cafe. It’s an evening of engaging, stimulating conversation, with a Q&A session following each talk.

Presented by Penn Arts and Sciences in partnership with the Office of University Communications, Penn Cafe events are free and open to the public, but RSVPs are encouraged. For more information or directions, contact Gina Bryan at 215-898-8721 or email at bryangm@upenn.edu.

Menu items are available for purchase. Happy Hour pricing from 4–6 p.m.

https://news.upenn.edu/sciencecafe

Religious Freedom in Trouble? An Interfaith Discussion

Thursday, September 28, 2017

National Constitution Center
525 Arch Street
6:00 p.m.–7:00 p.m.

During its 2017-18 theme year on “STATES OF RELIGIOUS FREEDOM,” The Andrea Mitchell Center for the Study of Democracy will study the U.S. experience within a comparative international context exploring how states, as political entities, accommodate or hinder religious expression and culture, as well as how social conditions affect and influence the practice of religious freedom.

Join Kristina Arriga, Vice Chair of the U.S. Commission on Internatioanl Religious Freedom (USCIRF); Dan Barker, co-president of the Freedom From Religion Foundation; Khalid Latif, Executive Director and Chaplain for the Islamic Center at New Yrk University; and David Saperstein, former U.S. Ambassador-at-Large for International Religious Freedom for the Obama Administration from 2014-2017, on Tuesday, September 28, for DCC’s opening event, “Religious Freedom in Trouble? An Interfaith Discussion.”

This event is co-sponsored by the University of Pennsylvania Department of Religious Studies.

For additional information about this event and future Andrea Mitchell Center for the Study of Democracy events, please visit www.sas.upenn.edu/andrea-mitchell-center.  

Poverty in the American South

Tuesday, October 10, 2017

World Cafe Live
3025 Walnut Street
6:00 p.m.–7:00 p.m.

Although poverty and uneven development exists throughout the United States, the South has had a disproportionate share of the nation’s socioeconomic problems. For decades, poverty has been the highest and most persistent in that region, and the Great Recession has only worsened the problem.

In this talk, Dr. Regina Baker, assistant professor of Sociology, will address the reasons for this regional disparity and why, as a nation, Americans should care. Drawing on her research on the South, Dr. Baker will discuss the role of demographic, economic, political and racial factors in understanding poverty in the context of place. She will also touch on the uncertainty of future safety nets for America’s most vulnerable populations in the current political climate.

Expert faculty from the University of Pennsylvania shed light on their research at the Penn Science Café. It’s an evening of engaging, stimulating conversation, with a Q&A session following each talk.

Presented by Penn Arts and Sciences in partnership with the Office of University Communications, Penn Café events are free and open to the public, but RSVPs are encouraged. For more information or directions, contact Gina Bryan at 215-898-8721 or email at bryangm@upenn.edu.

Menu items are available for purchase. Happy Hour pricing from 4–6 p.m.

https://news.upenn.edu/sciencecafe

The Real Record on Racial Attitudes

Tuesday, October 24, 2017

World Cafe Live
3025 Walnut Street
6:00 p.m.–7:00 p.m.

Issues of race and racial division have been prominent features of social organization and culture in the United States from as far back as the historical record goes. As a leading scholar in American race relations, Walter H. and Leonore C. Annenberg Professor in the Social Sciences, Dr.Camille Charles will map out the major divisions of, and trends in, U.S. racial attitudes and documents both significant progressive changes as well as substantial enduring frictions and conflicts that continue to make race such a fraught terrain. She will tackle the conceptually broad and analytically powerful record, which is a strong caution against glib generalities that attempt to reduce an enormously multifaceted social phenomenon to simplistic catch phrases like “racist America,” “the end of racism” or, more recently, “post-racial America.”

Expert faculty from the University of Pennsylvania shed light on their research in the arts, humanities, and social sciences at the Penn Lightbulb Cafe. It’s an evening of engaging, stimulating conversation, with a Q&A session following each talk.

Presented by Penn Arts and Sciences in partnership with the Office of University Communications, Penn Cafe events are free and open to the public, but RSVPs are encouraged. For more information or directions, contact Gina Bryan at 215-898-8721 or email at bryangm@upenn.edu.

Menu items are available for purchase. Happy Hour pricing from 4–6 p.m.

https://news.upenn.edu/sciencecafe

The Honorable A. Leon Higginbotham Memorial Lecture featuring Ta-Nehsi Coates

Wednesday, November 1, 2017

Zellerbach Theater, Annenberg Center
3680 Walnut Street
6:00 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.

Presented during the fall semester each year, The Honorable A. Leon Higginbotham, Jr. Memorial Lecture focuses on a topic, event, or personality in African American and African diasporic communities of either historical or contemporary significance in the areas of history, sociology, social justice, or law.  This year’s guest will be Ta-Nehisi Coates, national correspondent for The Atlantic and recipient of the MacArthur Fellowship.  He will discuss his book, Between the World and Me, which won the National Book Award in 2015.

The Honorable A. Leon Higginbotham, Jr. Memorial Lecture was instituted by Penn’s Afro-American Studies Program (predecessor of the Center for Africana Studies) in 1989 in honor of Judge Higginbotham’s contributions to the American legal and scholarly communities. 

Ta-Nehisi Coates’ new book We Were Eight Years in Power: An American Tragedy will be on sale at the event.

Hosted by the Center for Africana Studies and Penn Law

Co-sponsored by Penn Social Policy & Practice, Penn Graduate School of Education, Penn African-American Resource Center, Penn Black Alumni Society and the Annenberg Center for Performing Arts.

On the heels of an election that revealed deep divisions in our society, one thing that most can agree on is the urgent need for respectful, open discussion on the issues that divide us. In a special series of programs this winter and spring, Penn Arts and Sciences will work to promote the necessary conversations. This site highlights events and other opportunities to engage as a community to consider issues in our democratic society, along with contributions from our faculty and videos and other content to help spread the dialogue across campus and beyond.

HOW TO GET INVOLVED

Contact us at events@sas.upenn.edu to notify us about additional programs that are open to the campus community or to the general public.

Proposals from Penn Arts and Sciences faculty, students, or staff members for additional events are welcome and can be submitted to events@sas.upenn.edu.

The Office of the Dean invites additional proposals to support pedagogical innovation and other programs directed at facilitating conversation in the classroom. Please submit suggestions to sasdean@sas.upenn.edu.

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