SENIOR ADVISORS

Evan A. Feigenbaum

Evan A. Feigenbaum is vice president for studies at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, where he oversees research in Washington, Beijing and New Delhi on a dynamic region encompassing both East Asia and South Asia. He is also the 2019-20 James R. Schlesinger Distinguished Professor at the Miller Center of Public Affairs at the University of Virginia. Initially an academic with a PhD in Chinese politics from Stanford University, Feigenbaum’s career has spanned government service, think tanks, the private sector, and three major regions of Asia.

M. Taylor Fravel

M. Taylor Fravel is the Arthur and Ruth Sloan Professor of Political Science and Director of the MIT Security Studies Program at MIT. Taylor is a graduate of Middlebury College and Stanford University, where he received his PhD. He has been a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Olin Institute for Strategic Studies at Harvard University, a Predoctoral Fellow at the Center for International Security and Cooperation at Stanford University, a Fellow with the Princeton-Harvard China and the World Program and a Visiting Scholar at the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He also has graduate degrees from the London School of Economics and Oxford University, where he was a Rhodes Scholar. He currently serves on the editorial boards of the International Studies Quarterly, Security Studies, Journal of Strategic Studies, and The China Quarterly, and is a member of the board of directors for the National Committee on U.S.-China Relations. He is also the Principal Investigator of the Maritime Awareness Project.

Arthur Kroeber

Arthur Kroeber co-founded the China-focused research service Dragonomics in Beijing in 2002 and is the editor-in-chief of China Economic Quarterly. Since Dragonomics’ 2011 merger with Gavekal Research he has been head of research for the combined operation. Before founding Dragonomics, he was from 1987 to 2002 a journalist specializing in Asian economic affairs, and reported from China, India, Pakistan and other Asian countries. He has published widely in newspapers, magazines and academic journals, and is a fellow of the Brookings-Tsinghua Center in Beijing.

Kaiser Kuo

Kaiser Kuo is host of the Sinica Podcast, a weekly discussion of current affairs in China, and editor-at-large at Supchina.com. He recently repatriated to the United States after 20 years in Beijing, where he worked as Director of International Communications for Baidu. Before that he was a technology correspondent for Red Herring magazine, and also worked as director of digital strategy, China, for Ogilvy & Mather in Beijing. Kaiser was guitarist and co-founder of the band Chunqiu (Spring & Autumn), and was a founder of China’s first heavy metal band, Tang Dynasty. He has further enlivened contemporary Chinese music culture with the formation of another ethnically-oriented heavy metal rock group, Spring and Autumn. Kaiser’s musical involvement also involved playing bass for Dirty Deeds, an AC/DC cover band based in Beijing. He wrote for the foreigner-focused English-language magazine The Beijinger from 2001 to 2011. He is a graduate of the University of California, Berkeley, and holds an M.A. from the University of Arizona.

Susan A. Thornton

Susan A. Thornton is Visiting Lecturer in Law at Yale Law School and Senior Fellow at the Paul Tsai China Center. In 2018, she retired from the State Department after a 28-year diplomatic career focused primarily on East and Central Asia. In leadership roles in Washington, Thornton worked on China and Korea policy, including stabilizing relations with Taiwan, the U.S.-China Cyber Agreement, the Paris Climate Accord and led a successful negotiation in Pyongyang for monitoring of the Agreed Framework on denuclearization. In her 18 years of overseas postings in Central Asia, Russia, the Caucasus and China, Thornton’s leadership furthered U.S. interests and influence and maintained programs and mission morale in a host of difficult operating environments. Prior to joining the Foreign Service, she was among the first State Department Fascell Fellows and served from 1989–90 at the U.S. Consulate in Leningrad. She was also a researcher at the Foreign Policy Institute from 1987–91. Thornton holds degrees from the National Defense University’s Eisenhower School, the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies, and Bowdoin College. She speaks Russian, Mandarin Chinese and French, is a member of numerous professional associations and is on the Board of Trustees for the Eurasia Foundation.

Sophie Richardson

Sophie Richardson is the China director at Human Rights Watch. A graduate of the University of Virginia, the Hopkins-Nanjing Program, and Oberlin College, Dr. Richardson is the author of numerous articles on domestic Chinese political reform, democratization, and human rights in Cambodia, China, Indonesia, Hong Kong, the Philippines, and Vietnam. She has testified before the European Parliament and the US Senate and House of Representatives. She has provided commentary to the BBC, CNN, the Far Eastern Economic Review, Foreign Policy, National Public Radio, the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, and the Washington Post. Dr. Richardson is the author of China, Cambodia, and the Five Principles of Peaceful Coexistence (Columbia University Press, Dec. 2009), an in-depth examination of China’s foreign policy since 1954’s Geneva Conference, including rare interviews with policy makers.

Deborah Seligsohn

Deborah Seligsohn is an Assistant Professor in the Political Science Department at Villanova University. She completed her PhD studies at UCSD in June 2018. Her dissertation examined how corporate concentration (whether companies compete with one another) affects the Chinese government’s ability to regulate air pollution. She also researches other aspects of environmental governance in China, India, and US-China relations. She has taught environmental policy from both a domestic and comparative perspective. Prior to embarking on an academic career, she had a career in policy, first with the US State Department and then with the World Resources Institute. Her overarching passions are trying to understand how to achieve better environmental outcomes by looking deeply at root causes and engaging students to follow their own passions as informed citizens and professionals.

Mark Sidel

Mark Sidel is Doyle-Bascom Professor of Law and Public Affairs at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He also serves as consultant for Asia at the Washington-based International Center for Not-for-Profit Law (ICNL), focusing on China, India and Vietnam. In 2016 and 2017 he served as the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation Visiting Chair in Community Philanthropy at the Lilly Family School of Philanthropy at Indiana University; in spring 2018 as Ian Potter Foundation Fellow at the Australian Centre for Philanthropy and Nonprofit Studies in Brisbane; and in February-March 2020 as visiting scholar at the University of Western Australia Law School in Perth. Professor Sidel’s research and writing focus on the nonprofit sector and philanthropy (with a focus on Asia and the United States); modern secessionary movements; law and development; and comparative law.

Paul Triolo

Paul S. Triolo leads Eurasia Group’s newest practice, focusing on global technology policy issues, cybersecurity, internet governance, ICT regulatory issues, and emerging areas such as automation, AI/Big Data, ambient intelligence, and fintech/blockchain. Prior to joining Eurasia Group, Paul served in senior positions within the US government for more than 25 years, focusing primarily on China’s rise as a science and technology (S&T) and cyber power. He provided analytic support to the president and senior policymakers, and was the lead drafter for a number of widely acclaimed national estimates on China S&T innovation and industrial policies, as well as cyberspace issues. Paul’s technical background, including a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from Penn State University and work experience in Silicon Valley, along with his extensive work on internet governance and policy issues in government, have prepared him to tackle the substantial challenges companies will face in cyberspace. Paul is a China Digital Economy Fellow (non-resident) at New America.