Fellow Research

  • Ararat Plain Southeast Archaeological Project (APSAP)

    Ararat Plain Southeast Archaeological Project (APSAP)

    Fellow Peter J. Cobb directs the Ararat Plain Southeast Archaeological Project (APSAP), surveying and excavating sites on the southeastern edge of the Armenian Araxes River Valley. The project explores the movement of people through the landscape and human occupation of the area, with particular focus on the transition from Bronze to Iron Age as well as the Medieval period in the region. …Continue Reading Ararat Plain Southeast Archaeological Project (APSAP) Continue Reading Ararat Plain Southeast Archaeological Project (APSAP) Read More…

  • Phoenix Archaeological Project (PAP)

    Fellow Anna Sitz, currently a Postdocturate Researcher in the Department of Ancient History at Universität Tübingen, is Co-Leader of the Byzantine Landscape project and the Epigraphy project, part of the Phoenix Archaeological Project (PAP) in Carian Chersonnesos, Turkey. The epigraphy project focuses on the inscriptions of Phoenix, relocating and documenting already published inscriptions as well… Continue Reading Phoenix Archaeological Project (PAP)…Continue Reading Phoenix Archaeological Project (PAP) Read More…

  • Recovering Rayy Project

    Recovering Rayy Project

    Emerita Senior Fellow Renata Holod is heading up the Recovering Rayy Project, re-examining and publishing material from the site of Rayy held in the Penn Museum. The site of Rayy is south of present-day Tehran. It was initially investigated in the late 1930s by a joint expedition led by Dr. Erich F. Schmidt funded in part by the Penn Museum. The modern city of Tehran has engulfed the medieval site of Rayy, making the recovery of its material remains at Penn an important endeavor….Continue Reading Recovering Rayy Project Continue Reading Recovering Rayy Project Read More…

  • Smith Creek Archaeological Project

    Smith Creek Archaeological Project

    Senior Fellow Megan Kassabaum, Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology, has run the Smith Creek Archaeological Project since 2015. The site of Smith Creek in Mississippi consists of an open plaza surrounded by three earthen mounds. The Smith Creek Archaeological Project (SCAP) focuses on a pre-contact Native American mound site in the Lower Mississippi River Valley. The site served as an important ritual center for over 1000 years. Research at the site focuses on the complex relationships that existed between monument construction and identity, as well as foodways and politics through archaeological excavation and analysis of the recovered materials….Continue… Read More…