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SBSI Colloquia

Brown Bag and External Speaker Schedule

For the Fall 2020 semester, all colloquium will be held remotely.

Fall 2020 Colloquia

September 2020 - Cooney, Kobayashi, Heiphetz
Date Speaker Title/Abstract
September 16, 2020
12:00-1:15pm
SBSI Zoom
Gus Cooney
Postdoc, Wharton School
University of Pennsylvania
The Liking Gap and What it Means for Metaperception
 
I will describe a general research program on “the liking gap” – the finding that when developing new social relationships, people underestimate how much others like them. I will present experimental evidence for the liking gap across a variety of circumstances and discuss a number of moderators such as shyness, self-disclosure, and the extent to which people felt isolated during the pandemic. I will also discuss how the liking gap affects groups and teams working together. Finally, I will present evidence for some of the psychological processes that underlie the liking gap, with theoretical implications for the literature on motivated reasoning and metaperception broadly.
September 23, 2020
12:00-1:15pm
SBSI Zoom
Kenji Kobayashi
Postdoc, Kable Lab, Psychology
University of Pennsylvania

The Influence of Person Perception on Social Decision Making and Information Seeking

We decide how to interact with others based on how we perceive them. A traditional view posits that person perception is structured along two core dimensions, warmth and competence, which have distinct effects on social decision making (Jenkins et al., 2018), but recent evidence suggests that the warmth dimension contains two dissociable aspects, morality and sociability (Goodwin, 2015). I will present two ongoing studies on how people use information about others to shape perception in service of decision making. First, in a decision context where behavior is influenced by others’ warmth but not competence (Trust game), people are willing to pay more for information that is diagnostic on warmth, irrespective of its diagnosticity on competence. This suggests that people adaptively seek social information based on its benefit for upcoming decisions. Second, among traits associated with warmth, those specifically associated with morality reliably predict behavior across multiple economic games (Trust game and Ultimatum game), demonstrating the importance of morality perception in social decision making.

September 30, 2020
12:00-1:15pm
SBSI Zoom
Larisa Heiphetz
Assistant Professor, Columbia Social and Moral Cognition Lab 
Columbia University

Perceived (Im)morality and Identity

What makes us who we are? Philosophers have long suggested that it’s our memories — if we remembered our lives differently, our entire sense of self might change. This talk considers the extent to which laypeople’s judgments match philosophical theories and what consequences these judgments hold for social perception. In Part I, I discuss data showing that children and adults perceive moral beliefs to be especially central to identity. This is particularly true of widely shared moral beliefs, which are shared with most other people in one’s culture. In Part II, I ask how children and adults think about the identities of people who have violated widely shared moral norms. Here, findings suggest that laypeople, especially children, attribute such behavior (e.g., contact with the justice system, which is often perceived to reflect a violation of widely shared moral norms) to internal “essences.” Such perceptions lead to more negative responses toward people who are perceived to have committed transgressions. When discussing immorality, emphasizing behaviors (“she did something wrong”) as opposed to internal characteristics (“she is a bad person”) may benefit people who have transgressed — which, at some point, will be all of us.

October 2020 - Beltrama, Danese, Jenkins, Silver
Date Speaker Title/Abstract
October 7, 2020
12:00-1:15pm
SBSI Zoom

Andrea Beltrama
Postdoc, MindCORE
University of Pennsylvania

We’re what we say. From conversation to person perception.

Since Grice’s (Grice 1975) foundational work, much research in linguistics and psychology has proceeded under the assumption that conversation is a cooperative enterprise — one in which all interlocutors are working together towards attaining an efficient exchange of information, and expect each other to behave in a way conducive to achieving this goal. An outstanding question, however, concerns how listeners rely on conversational behavior to draw social inferences about the speaker — e.g., to evaluate the interlocutors’ behavior in the conversation, and form impressions about them. To address this issue, I present results from two studies exploring how the social evaluation of a speaker is informed by two core dimensions of cooperative communication: Informativeness — i.e., how much information the speaker conveys in the context; and Relevance — i.e., how related the speaker’s utterances are to the conversation topic. Experiment 1 suggests that the social perception of a speaker in terms of both warmth and competence  (Fiske et al. 2007) is severely affected by whether the speaker provides (or fails to provide) relevant information; in addition, speakers providing highly informative responses are rated higher along both social dimensions than those providing less informative ones, but only when their contribution is relevant. Experiment 2 suggests that the social penalty for irrelevant speakers can be mitigated if the speaker provides a reason to justify their decision to veer off the conversational topic; this effect, however, is only observed for competence, but not for warmth. Taken together, our findings suggest that listeners keep track of different properties of linguistic communication when forming an impression of a speaker; and that different dimensions of social evaluation are differentially affected by conversational behavior.

October 14, 2020
12:00-1:15pm
SBSI Zoom

Einav Hart
Assistant Professor, Management
George Mason University

The (Better than Expected) Consequences of Asking Sensitive Questions

Within a conversation, individuals balance competing objectives, such as the motive to gather information and the motive to create a favorable impression. Across five experimental studies (N=1,427), we demonstrate that individuals avoid asking sensitive questions because they believe that asking sensitive questions will make their conversational partners uncomfortable and cause them to form negative perceptions. We demonstrate that the aversion to asking sensitive questions is often misguided. Question askers systematically overestimate the impression management and interpersonal costs of asking sensitive questions. In conversations with friends and with strangers and in both face-to-face and computer mediated conversations, respondents formed similarly favorable impressions of conversational partners who asked sensitive questions (e.g., “How much is your salary?”) as they did of conversational partners who asked non-sensitive questions (e.g., “How do you get to work?”). We assert that individuals make a potentially costly mistake when they avoid asking sensitive questions, and may overestimate the interpersonal costs of asking sensitive questions.

October 21, 2020
12:00-1:15pm
SBSI Zoom

Anna Jenkins
Assistant Professor, Psychology
University of Pennsylvania

The uncertain social world and its consequences for decision-making

In order to make decisions, people regularly need to fill in gaps in information. This need may particularly characterize the social world, where much of the information relevant to a decision cannot be perceived directly but must instead be inferred from indirect cues to people’s likely intentions, beliefs, and behaviors (does he want to cooperate? what will she think is fair? where will they be if I can’t find them?). What are the various routes through which the mind reduces this uncertainty, and what consequences do they have for behavior? First, I will present evidence that patterns of brain activation typically thought to support domain-specific processes for social cognition may instead be explained by the greater uncertainty associated with the social world. Next, I will discuss two different routes by which uncertainty in the social world may be reduced and some of their consequences for social decision-making. Specifically, I will discuss evidence that differences in people’s spontaneous imagination of the future on behalf of different social counterparts influence their choices on behalf of those individuals and that information about others’ social group membership can disrupt, rather than facilitate, strategic interactions.

October 28, 2020
12:00-1:15pm
SBSI Zoom

Ike Silver
Graduate Student
University of Pennsylvania, The Wharton School

TBD

November 2020 - Dahan, Crone
Date Speaker Title/Abstract
November 4, 2020
12:00-1:15pm
SBSI Zoom

Delphine Dahan
Associate Professor, Psychology
University of Pennsylvania

TBD

November 11, 2020
12:00-1:15pm
N/A

Veteran’s Day

N/A

November 18, 2020
12:00-1:15pm
SBSI Zoom

Damien Crone
Postdoc, Positive Psychology Center
University of Pennsylvania

TBD
December 2020 - Tybur
Date Speaker Title/Abstract
December 2, 2020
12:00-1:15pm
SBSI Zoom

Josh Tybur
Associate Professor, Psychology

VU University, Amsterdam

TBD

Past SBSI Colloquia Series

Fall 2019 Colloquia

September 2019 - Yudkin

Date

Speaker

Title/Abstract

September 18, 2019
12:00-1:15pm
Solomon B50

Daniel Yudkin
Postdoc, SBSI
University of Pennsylvania

Flexible Ethics: On the Activation, Transportation, and Misperception of Moral Values
Abstract

October 2019 - Nave, Yaden, Mullett, Vazire, Rimeikyte

 

Date Speaker Title/Abstract
October 2, 2019
12:00-1:15pm
Solomon B50

Gideon Nave
Assistant Professor, Marketing
University of Pennsylvania, The Wharton School

We are what we watch: movie’s contents predict the personality of their social media fans
Abstract

October 9, 2019
12:00-1:15pm
Solomon B50

David Yaden
Graduate Student, Psychology Department
University of Pennsylvania

The Psychology of Philosophy
Abstract

October 16, 2019
12:00-1:15pm
Solomon B50

Timothy Mullet
Assistant Professor, Behavioural Science
University of Warwick, Warwick Business School

Using health and policing data to predict impulsive and harmful behaviours 
Abstract

October 25, 2019
3:30-5:30pm
Levin SAIL (Room 111)

Simine Vazire
Associate Professor, Psychology
University of California, Davis

Do we want to be credible or incredible?
Abstract

October 30, 2019
12:00-1:15pm
Solomon B50

Vaida Rimeikyte
Postdoc, Jenkins Lab
University of Pennsylvania

Neural processing of decision costs and aversive events
Abstract

 

November 2019 - Bhatia, Lelkes, Guan
Date Speaker Title/Abstract
November 6, 2019
12:00-1:15pm
Solomon B50

Nazli Bhatia
Lecturer
University of Pennsylvania, The Wharton School

“I was Going to Offer $10,000 but…”:                  The Effects of Phantom Anchors in Negotiation
Abstract

November 13, 2019
12:00-1:15pm
Solomon B50

Yphtach Lelkes
Assistant Professor, Communication
University of Pennsylvania, Annenberg School for Communication

The structure and (an) origin for political beliefs
Abstract

November 20, 2019
12:00-1:15pm
Solomon B50

Kate Guan
Visiting Scholar, Goodwin Lab
University of British Columbia

How do we feel when angels turn out to be demons?: The experience and effects of misjudging moral character
Abstract
December 2019 - Richards
Date Speaker Title/Abstract
December 4, 2019
12:00-1:15pm
Solomon B50

Keana Richards
Graudate Student, HBO Lab
University of Pennsylvania

Gender, preparation, and competitiveness
Abstract

Spring 2020 Colloquia

January 2020 - Skitka, Smith
Date Speaker Title/Abstract

January 22, 2020
12:00-1:30pm
Levin SAIL (Room 111)

Linda Skitka
Professor, Psychology
University of Illinois at Chicago

The Social and Political Implications of Moral Conviction
Abstract

January 29, 2020
12:00-1:15pm
Solomon D37

Kristopher Smith
Postdoc, SBSI
University of Pennsylvania

How exposure to other cultures is changing Hadza cooperation
Abstract

February 2020 - Platt, Zhao, Mattan
Date Speaker Title/Abstract
February 5, 2020
12:00-1:15pm
Solomon D37

Michael Platt
James S. Riepe University Professor, Departments of Neuroscience, Psychology, & Marketing
University of Pennsylvania

Climate Change and the Social Brain

February 12, 2020
12:00-1:15pm
Solomon D37

Joyce Zhao
Graduate Student, Computational Behavioral Science Lab
University of Pennsylvania

Towards a space of behavioral interventions: Insights from the drift diffusion model
Abstract

February 19, 2020
12:00-1:15pm
Solomon D37

Bradley Mattan
Postdoc, Communication Neuroscience Lab
University of Pennsylvania

A multi-method approach to how perceiver gender shapes status-based evaluations
Abstract

 

March 2020 - Mollerstrom
Date Speaker Title/Abstract
March 4, 2020
12:00-1:15pm
Solomon D37

Johanna Mollerstrom
Associate Professor, Economics
George Mason University

Can Simple Advice Eliminate the Gender Gap in Willingness to Compete?
Abstract