Kichwa Hatari at Penn: Running the First Kichwa-Language Radio Show in the United States

Kichwa Hatari is a weekly radio program, the first in the indigenous Kichwa language in the U.S, aimed at reaching the Quechua/Kichwa population in the United States, particularly in New York.

This initiative is blending radio and community work into a one-of-a-kind project that is as much about revolutionizing radio airwaves as it is about cultural/linguistic empowerment and grassroots social organizing.

Kichwa Hatari members will participate at the Andean Language and Cultural Advocates Roundtable, as a part of the “2017 Thinking Andean Studies Conference“.

 

Andean Language and Cultural Advocates Roundtable
February 11, 2017

12:15pm – 1:30pm  |  Widener Room (Penn Museum)

  • Gringo Kullki: Sucres to Dollars in Ecuador (Film and Presentation)
    Prof. Regina Harrison (University of Maryland)
  • Running the First Kichwa-Language Radio Show in the United States
    Kichwa Hatari

 

For the complete conference schedule, please click here.

Kuyayky celebrates Indigenous cultures at Penn

Andean Music Concert by Kuyayky celebrates the relevance and importance of Indigenous and Andean Heritage

Edda Bonilla and José Luis Hurtado, founders of the Miami-based Kuyayky Foundation, will be recognized for their life trajectory on promoting Andean Heritage around the world. This event will take place during the academic conference “Thinking Andean Studies” at the University of Pennsylvania.
Natives of Jauja, Junín (Central Peruvian Andes), Bonilla and Hurtado have educated generations of musicians, dancers and scholars in different ways: working on music revitalization projects in the Andes, partnering with organizations to support migrant communities in South Florida, starting children’s orchestras in Miami and Jauja, raising awareness on the relevance of Andean heritage in today’s world.

Along with some of the current Kuyayky members, they will be offering a music and dance presentation during Thinking Andean Studies at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia.

Event is Free and Open to the Public

Kuyayky at Penn
Friday, February 10th, 2017: 7pm
Penn Museum (3260 South Street, Philadelphia)

Fore more info about the “Thinking Andean Studies Conference”, click here: https://web.sas.upenn.edu/quechua/thinking-andean-studies-conference/

 

Penn students were featured on Peru’s Quechua-Language News Broadcast “Ñuqanchik”

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On Friday, December 16th, 2016, Penn students were featured on Peru’s First-Ever Quechua Language News Broadcast “Ñuqanchik“.

According El País, the program’s title Ñuqanchik is the Quechua word for the inclusive “we”, as opposed to the more limited notion of “ñuqayku”, which refers more specifically to a collective. Such linguistic nuances will be fundamental to Ñoqanchik’s news style, and as anchor Clodimoro Landeo explained, “Quechua isn’t only useful to translate or repeat what is said in Spanish, but rather to give other references. Its principal value is in complementing the same information through a different perspective. For example, in Quechua water isn’t just a chemical element, but also a vital element. It has a different value.”  – Source: Remezcla

 

Penn students sent greetings and congratulated “Ñuqanchik” for their work on making Quechua relevant on TV. Ñuqanchik is produced by TV Perú and Radio Nacional – Peru’s public television and radio networks.

 

Watch the video here:

Peruvian Community gathering with the Consul of Peru

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Wednesday, November 16th at 6pm

Greenfield Intercultural Center at Penn
(3708 Chesnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104)

Peruvian Community gathering with the Consul of Peru

Mr. Vitaliano Gallardo, the Consul of Peru for New Jersey and Pennsylvania, visited Penn. Peruvians, Peruvian-Americans and the Peru lovers community came for an informal gathering with him. We haved Peruvian food and music.

 

Facebook event page, here

Julia García, promoter of Quechua and Bolivian culture at QSAM

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On November 5th, during the second edition of the Quechua Student Alliance Meeting (QSAM) at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, we recognized Ms. Julia Garcia for her life-long committed to promote Quechua and Bolivian Culture in the United States.

Garcia, a native from Cochambamba, is an executive council member at Comité Pro Bolivia, she also teaches at Jefferson Middle School in Arglington Va, and is a language partner for the Washington DC-based Global Languages Network.

For more info about QSAM please, click here.

 

 

Andean Music Educators to be honored at UPenn

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Edda Bonilla and José Luis Hurtado, founders of the Miami-based Kuyayky Foundation, will be recognized for their life trajectory on promoting Andean Heritage in Perú and the United States. This event will take place during the academic conference “Thinking Andean Studies” at the University of Pennsylvania.

Natives of Jauja, Junín (Central Peruvian Andes), Bonilla and Hurtado have educated generations of musicians, dancers and scholars in different ways: working on music revitalization projects in the Andes, partnering with organizations to support migrant communities in South Florida, starting children’s orchestras in Miami and Jauja, raising awareness on the relevance of Andean heritage in today’s world.

Along with some of the current Kuyayky members, they will be offering a music and dance presentation during Thinking Andean Studies (February, 10-11, 2017) at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia.

More info about the conference, here.

 

*Kuyayky is a Quechua word that means: “I love you”.

[film series] Is the Quechua language on the rise or decline?

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Sunday, November 13th
2pm-4pm

Penn Museum
Quechua: The fading Inca language (2010) Dir. Gabina Funegra (19min) & newly translated short Quechua dramas from Youtube. Post screening discussion lead by Américo Mendoza-Mori (Quechua)

The Quechua language, the largest indigenous language group in the Americas, has been suppressed and maligned for hundreds of years, but now is enjoying a revival of esteem and usage thanks to specific governmental policies and the enthusiasm of students from as far as Paris and Tokyo.

More info here

Peruvian historian Cecilia Mendez will be the keynote speaker at “Thinking Andean Studies”

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Cecilia Méndez, associate professor of History at the University of California-Santa Barbara, will be the keynote speaker at the second edition of Thinking Andean Studies: an interdisciplinary conference (Philadelphia, February 10-11, 2017).

Méndez focus primarily her work on social and political history of the Andean region. Her research highlights the importance of late eighteenth-century, and nineteenth-century political developments in shaping modern conceptions nationhood, citizenship, and “race.”

 

Keynote Talk: “Foundational Violences: Silences, memory, and fratricide in Peru’s historiographical narratives, 1781-2017”

Saturday, February 11th, 5:00pm – 6:15pm | Widener Room (Penn Museum)  

Abstract:

Like other American countries after independence,  Peru was engulfed in civil wars throughout the nineteenth century. But the memories of these wars did not shape national political identities in twentieth-century Peru as they did  in, say, twentieth-century Colombia, Uruguay, Argentina, or the  United States. Rather, the memories of Peru’s nineteenth century civil wars have been overshadowed by  those of  the War of the Pacific that Peru lost to Chile (1879-1883), and the uprising lead by Túpac Amaru II in 1780-181.

Despite having occurred four decades before the establishment of Peru’s national state, the Túpac Amaru rebellion can be studied as a civil war by virtue of its lingering effects in the country’s memory.  But insofar as it was, for the most part, a repressed  memory, it was not integrated into an open, explicitly political discourse at the national level, at least until the 1960s.  My presentation analyzes the silencing and  memories of the Túpac Amaru rebellion and subsequent –mostly indigenous– rebellions (1780-1815)  as they manifested themselves in popular and  historiographical narratives from shortly after they occurred. It postulates that the erasure of these uprisings from the earliest  foundational historiographical  narratives of the nation cannot be interpreted as forgetfulness but  rather as an uneasiness toward their violent character. Yet, it was not violence per se that unsettled the dominant historiography, as much its remembrance in “ethnic” terms. Put it other words: the rebellion of Túpac Amaru  was not silenced because it was violent but because it evoked, in mostly Creole writers, the idea of  Indians exerting violence. 

My ultimate goal is to decipher a seeming paradox; to wit, how the very country that produced both the major anti-Spanish colonial insurgency in Spanish America prior to the wars of independence, and the bloodiest Marxists guerrilla in the 20th century, crafted one of the most conservative –“insurgency averse” – historical narratives of national foundation in the continent.

 

For more information about “Thinking Andean Studies” conference, please click here. (deadline for submissions is November 20, 2016)

 

[talk] “Visions of Nature in Quechua and Mayan Literature” by Charles Pigott

flyerpigott[talk] “Visions of Nature in Quechua and Mayan Literature” by Charles Pigott (University of Cambridge)

Tuesday, October 18, 2016
6pm

Place: Cherpack Conference Room (Williams Hall 543, University of Pennsylvania)

Dr. Pigott’s research focuses on the indigenous cultures and languages of Latin America, particularly the oral and written literature of the Maya and Quechua. In view of the fact that such cultures often have very different interpretative frameworks to the ‘Western’ academic tradition, he combines the perspectives of several disciplines including literary studies, antropology, linguistics and philosophy, in order to attain a holistic understanding.

Even free and open to the public